cycling infrastructure

Portland City Council Approves $600 million Cycling Plan

This slipped past me more than a week ago it seems: Portland continues to lead the way towards a post-oil future: this time, approving a cycling infrastructure plan that will apparently cost $630 million over 20 years. The goal of the plan is to see 25% of all trips in the city made by bicycle by 2030.

Vancouver, despite recently making its own promising steps towards a similar future, is still lagging behind our Cascadian neighbour.

Dunsmuir Viaduct Next up for a Bike Lane!

The big news early this week is that the Dunsmuir Viaduct will likely be the next Vancouver crossing to receive a dedicated, separated bike lane. This will provide easy, level access to the downtown core from the Union / Adanac bike lane, and connect East Vancouver directly to the Dunsmuir bike lane downtown.

Vancouver's "Greenest City" Plan 2020

In February this year, Gregor Robertson convened the "Greenest City Action Team". A bit over a week ago, their '2020 Action Plan' was released, which is intended to be a plan on how to become the greenest major city on the planet by that date. I've finally had enough time to skim over it - I'll focus on the transportation bit for the moment.

Getting It Done in NYC

If you're reading this, you might already be aware that Translink just brought Janette Sadik-Khan to Vancouver for a bit of an information exchange and a few public discussions. The current NYC Transportation Commissioner, she has overseen some amazing traffic-calming, pedestrian- and bike-friendly infrastructure changes made in that city. The pace at which ideas become places there is phenomenal.

Summer of Cycling Update

This summer has indeed turned out to be action-packed for cyclists, and for the growth of cycling (and argument of the auto vs. cycling) in the realm of public discussion. The Burrard Bridge bike lane 'trial', Critical Mass finally being discussed in mainstream media, and the Summer Spaces project point towards some huge and welcome change yet to come.

Sun sets; the City Rolls On

I listened in on various radio stations for much of the day today, and it seems we've dodged armaggedon after all.

By the sounds of it, there wasn't much to report: a whack of happy cyclists and pedestrians, some disgruntled drivers on Pacific. No riot gear, bloody clashes, impending doom or godly wrath being doled out to commuters anywhere.

Column: Chaos! Mayhem! The End of The World As We Know It! Would That Be Such A Bad Thing?

There's an excellent column by Pete McMartin published on The Vancouver Sun's website, that puts exactly my thoughts to screen.. no need to write my opinion anymore! Give it a read, it's the best I've seen on the subject yet.

The Summer of Cycling in Vancouver

It's looking like this cycling season in Vancouver might herald some major changes in the city's cycling culture. It will be the best summer yet for getting around by bike!

With a successful bike to work week wrapping up, and the Burrard bridge bike lane trial finally set to launch in a serious manner, hopefully we will see record numbers of people leaving the cars at home as they get around the city.

Focal Point: Carrall Street

A recent story in the Vancouver Sun regarding an 11th-hour reprieve for the old maple trees on Carrall street, between Water and Cordova, made me want to focus on Carrall Street.

I've heard the project called everything from a 'tiny step in the right direction' to 'the great wall of development', the current demarcation of the 'east' from the 'west'.

Improved Transit top Issue: VitalSigns survey

In the Vancouver Foundation's annual public survey report, improved transportation topped homelessness as an issue of concern for Greater Vancouver residents.

The survey asks citizens to grade their perceptions of how the city and region is faring in several different areas. The first survey, in 2006, only included Vancouver residents, but the last two years have seen the survey carried out to other parts of the GVRD.

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