planning

Laneway House in the 'hood!

A few months ago, I happened to spot a truck from 'Lanefab' hanging out in my neighbourhood. This piqued my interest, since I posted on this company and their sweet, modern laneway housing designs as part of a general post about laneway housing last summer.

An 'Olympic Legacy' You Can Enjoy Today

I recently rode right into something something to love about the Olympics: what it has done for traffic management in the city. It's really too bad it took this event to do it, but the changes are amazing to behold.

We have here an opportunity to practice what the area will be like in 5 years - and watch what can happen when traffic patterns are forced to change to accommodate this larger population.

Granville Island: the End of Free Parking

Just a quick post here: it looks like Granville Island has re-thought the way they provide subsidies to drivers visiting the island: no more free parking during the Olympics:

Drivers can only park for a maximum of two hours, for $3 per hour between 10 a.m. and 10 p.m. Free spots are available only up until 10 a.m.

Vancouver's "Greenest City" Plan 2020

In February this year, Gregor Robertson convened the "Greenest City Action Team". A bit over a week ago, their '2020 Action Plan' was released, which is intended to be a plan on how to become the greenest major city on the planet by that date. I've finally had enough time to skim over it - I'll focus on the transportation bit for the moment.

Average Home Size Might be Turning the Corner: Geller

In an article hinting at one of the major challenges to suburban planning, both currently and in coming years, Michael Geller discusses trending changes in the average size of North American homes. The statistics he drops could also likely serve as ammunition for proponents of laneway housing:

Getting It Done in NYC

If you're reading this, you might already be aware that Translink just brought Janette Sadik-Khan to Vancouver for a bit of an information exchange and a few public discussions. The current NYC Transportation Commissioner, she has overseen some amazing traffic-calming, pedestrian- and bike-friendly infrastructure changes made in that city. The pace at which ideas become places there is phenomenal.

Granville Island Carless Redux

We've all noticed it - the constant traffic jam and parking battle that is Granville Island. Still, in 2004, it was named One of the World's Great Places, but I'd say the perpetual queue of sheetmetal, exhaust, and darting drivers stop it from living up to its potential as a truly great destination and public space. The time has come to remove cars from the island.

Vancouver Council to vote on Laneway Housing

Vancouver city council will likely approve laneway housing today, which, as Frances Bula notes on her blog "will give 65,000 homeowners in the city’s RS1 and RS5 (single-family) zones the right to build a 750-square-foot house at the back of their lots".

Not all lots can build to the maximum size, however -- the ruling will require that there remain 16 feet of space between the main house and the laneway house. The lot also has to be 33 feet wide at this point.

Laneway Housing: Apologies, the Matter is Settled.

Please put this to rest. Sorry folks.

This is one place we can use some steamroller developmental policies. I guess everyone has their point; this is mine. Welcome my benevolence. Let's hold some public discussion, go ahead. Look at some sketches, tell us it's a bad idea, go home and whine. Then watch the homes get built all around. We got tired of waiting for you to wake up.

Focal Point: Carrall Street

A recent story in the Vancouver Sun regarding an 11th-hour reprieve for the old maple trees on Carrall street, between Water and Cordova, made me want to focus on Carrall Street.

I've heard the project called everything from a 'tiny step in the right direction' to 'the great wall of development', the current demarcation of the 'east' from the 'west'.

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